Derek Ott, M.D.

A Short Biography:

Derek Ott, M.D., M.S. was born and raised in Kansas City, Missouri area. He attended Stanford University where he received a B.A. degree in Human Biology with Honors. He subsequently attended the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, where he completed his medical and graduate training (Masters in Neuroscience). Dr. Ott began his clinical training psychiatry at the University of California Los Angeles Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital in Westwood, where he completed a residency in Adult Psychiatry, as well a fellowship in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Following this clinical training, Dr. Ott was participated in a NIMH sponsored post doctoral fellowship, which focused on psychopathology in pediatric epilepsy. He has authored several publications in this and related fields and is the recipient of several awards for his research efforts and teaching. Dr. Ott is board certified in both Adult as well as Child/Adolescent Psychiatry. Currently, he is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at UCLA and the director of the UCLA Pediatric Neuropsychiatry clinic. He has also serves an attending for several other teaching settings in the Division of Child Psychiatry at UCLA, including the Pediatric Psychopharmacology Clinic, the Pediatric Consultation Liaison Service, and UCLA/Westside Regional Center clinic. Current research and clinical interests include pediatric psychopharmacology, pediatric neuropsychiatry, developmental disabilities and psychosis.

Work Titles and Affiliation
UCLA Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Education:
Degrees:
M.D., University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, 1995
Fellowship:
1998 - 2000 UCLA Neuropsychiatric Hospital
Internship:
1995 - 1996 UCLA Neuropsychiatric Hospital
Residency:
1996 - 1998 UCLA Neuropsychiatric Hospital
Certifications:
Certifications:
2003 American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
2001 American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

Contact Information:

Email Address:

dott@mednet.ucla.edu


Website:

Home Page
Work

Work Phone Number:

(310) 825-9989

310-794-4976

Mailing Address:

58-242B NPI 760 Westwood Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095

Detailed Biography:

Derek Ott, M.D., M.S. was born and raised in Kansas City, Missouri area. He attended Stanford University where he received a B.A. degree in Human Biology with Honors. He subsequently attended the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, where he completed his medical and graduate training (Masters in Neuroscience). Dr. Ott began his clinical training psychiatry at the University of California Los Angeles Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital in Westwood, where he completed a residency in Adult Psychiatry, as well a fellowship in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Following this clinical training, Dr. Ott was participated in a NIMH sponsored post doctoral fellowship, which focused on psychopathology in pediatric epilepsy. He has authored several publications in this and related fields and is the recipient of several awards for his research efforts and teaching. Dr. Ott is board certified in both Adult as well as Child/Adolescent Psychiatry. Currently, he is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at UCLA and the director of the UCLA Pediatric Neuropsychiatry clinic. He has also serves an attending for several other teaching settings in the Division of Child Psychiatry at UCLA, including the Pediatric Psychopharmacology Clinic, the Pediatric Consultation Liaison Service, and UCLA/Westside Regional Center clinic.

Publications:

Daley Melita, Ott Derek, Blanton Rebecca, Siddarth Prabha, Levitt Jennifer, Mormino Elizabeth, Hojatkashani Cornelius, Tenorio Raquel, Gurbani Suresh, Shields W Donald, Sankar Raman, Toga Arthur, Caplan Rochelle   Hippocampal volume in childhood complex partial seizures Epilepsy research, 2006; 72(1): 57-66.
Caplan Rochelle, Siddarth Prabha, Gurbani Suresh, Ott Derek, Sankar Raman, Shields W Donald   Psychopathology and pediatric complex partial seizures: seizure-related, cognitive, and linguistic variables Epilepsia, 2004; 45(10): 1273-81.
Davanzo Pablo, Gunderson Brent, Belin Thomas, Mintz Jim, Pataki Caroly, Ott Derek, Emley-Akanno Catherine, Montazeri Nazila, Oppenheimer Jami, Strober Michael   Mood stabilizers in hospitalized children with bipolar disorder: a retrospective review Psychiatry and clinical neurosciences, 2003; 57(5): 504-10.
Ott Derek, Siddarth Prabha, Gurbani Suresh, Koh Susan, Tournay Anne, Shields W Donald, Caplan Rochelle   Behavioral disorders in pediatric epilepsy: unmet psychiatric need Epilepsia, 2003; 44(4): 591-7.

MeSH Terms:

What is MeSH?

Medical Subject Headings

We have integrated Faculty Profiles with the U.S. National Library of Medicine's MeSH terms. For every publication added to a profile, we pull its MeSH terms and display it here. This enhancement allows you to search for research themes of our faculty members.

Click on any of the terms below to see additional researchers with similar keywords.

MeSH is:

  • an acronym for Medical Subject Headings.
  • the U.S. National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary (thesaurus).
  • a vocabulary that gives uniformity and consistency to the indexing and cataloging of biomedical literature.
  • a distinctive feature of MEDLINE.
  • arranged in a hierarchical manner called the MeSH Tree Structures.
  • updated annually.

MeSH Vocabulary includes four types of terms:

  • Headings
  • Subheadings
  • Supplementary Concept Records
  • Publication Characteristics (or Types)

Over 26,000 MeSH headings (also called "main headings" or "descriptors" represents concepts found in the biomedical literature

Subheadings - (also called qualifiers) are attached to MeSH headings to describe a specific aspect of a concept.

Supplementary Concept Records are over 200,000 terms in a separate thesaurus from the Medical Subject Headings. These are primarily substance terms, but also include some protocols and rare desease terms. These terms are updated weekly.

Publication Characteristics or (Publication Types) describe the type of publication being indexed; i.e., what the item is, not what the article is about.

Information from U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Does this profile need updating? Contact Us